Seahawks Offensive Line Coach Tom Cable on his Starting Center, the Arizona Cardinals, and More

Offensive-line coach Tom Cable says Patrick Lewis will start at center this week, and discusses an aggressive Arizona defense.

Seahawks offensive line coach/assistant head coach Tom Cable addressed the media following Wednesday's practice, covering topics ranging from the development of his line to this week's opponent, the Arizona Cardinals, to who will start at center on Sunday. Here are a few highlights.

1. Patrick Lewis will start at center.

Patrick Lewis took over the starting center job in Week 6, but injured his ankle in that game. That injury meant Drew Nowak, the starter in Seattle's first five games, went back to starting, but now that Lewis is fully healthy, Cable said he'll get another crack at the job.

"We made the move and put Patrick in there, then he got hurt," Cable said. "We don't take jobs away around here by injury, so it's still his ball, and he'll have the opportunity to go prove that on Sunday."

Lewis, who was signed off Cleveland's practice squad last season, started four games at center last season, including both wins over Arizona, the second of which saw the Seahawks set a franchise record with 596 total yards in a 35-6 victory.

"I think he's fired up; I'm fired up for him," Cable said. "The biggest thing for us right now is to just find that consistency that you look for in offensive line play. That's really key."

2. The Cardinals are still aggressive even with a new defensive coordinator.

With Todd Bowles leading their defense, the Cardinals developed a reputation as one of the NFL's most aggressive defenses over the past two seasons, and even though Bowles is now the head coach of the New York Jets, the Seahawks expect to see a blitz-happy Cardinals defense once again.

"It's the same," Cable said. "Lots of pressure, 3-4 structure, but it's all pressure, same as they've been… Good secondary, so you take your chances covering people, you know?"

That pressure got to Seattle in the first game, with Wilson getting sacked seven times, but the Cardinals only had one in the next meeting.

On how his team has handled blitzing defenses so far this season, Cable said. "I don't think very good yet, but that's something we're targeting, trying to improve, so we'll see."  

Of course, handling a blitz is on more players than just the five linemen, and Cable is encouraged by the communication he is seeing between quarterback Russell Wilson and the line.

"That's part of this whole picture," he said. "As a team I think we're still a work in progress. I think it's getting better. I'm kind of excited that I think the communication thing is starting to come around in the right way."

3. Cable has seen progress, but is more worried about what's next than what happened in Dallas.

The Seahawks have gotten the rushing game going in recent games, and did not allow a sack against the Cowboys after giving up 31 in their first seven games, and all of that is encouraging, but Cable is more interested in seeing what happens this week.

"Yeah, I think we're getting there, but it's a process, always," he said. "Trying to go the next game, do it again, then go to the next game, do it again, so we'll see if we can put a second half together."

Along those same lines, Cable was asked if this has been a more challenge year for him considering the inexperience on the line, but said he doesn't think in those terms: "I think they're always like this. I look at it different than y'all do. To me, it's like, 'Did we do it today?' I don't care about the big picture, what stats say; if we're good enough to win the game, then none of that other stuff matters to me, because that's what we do this for. You worry about the next week. It was a good bye week, I think we're fresher, we have a big challenge ahead on Sunday, that's kind of how I think."

The Seahawks took to the practice field on Competition Wednesday to prepare the first of a three-week home stand starting with the Arizona Cardinals at CenturyLink Field this Sunday.  

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