Coaches

Mike Holmgren
Head Coach
College:
USC
Hometown:
San Francisco, CA
Experience:
23

Mike Holmgren enters his tenth season as head coach of the Seattle Seahawks after guiding the club to its fourth straight NFC West title in 2007 and the club’s fifth consecutive postseason appearance. His clubs have posted winning records seven of his nine seasons, including five division titles after winning the AFC West in 1999, his first season with the team and a club-record 13 wins in 2005. He announced on January 22, 2008 that this season will be his last in Seattle.

 

The league’s winningest active head coach, Holmgren is tied (Philadelphia’s Andy Reid) as the third longest-tenured head coach with the same club behind Tennessee’s Jeff Fisher and Denver’s Mike Shanahan (14 years). His 170-110 (.607) career head coaching record trails Hall of Famer Joe Gibbs’ 171-101 record for tenth place in NFL history.

Mike Holmgren enters his tenth season as head coach of the Seattle Seahawks after guiding the club to its fourth straight NFC West title in 2007 and the club’s fifth consecutive postseason appearance. His clubs have posted winning records seven of his nine seasons, including five division titles after winning the AFC West in 1999, his first season with the team and a club-record 13 wins in 2005. He announced on January 22, 2008 that this season will be his last in Seattle.

 

The league’s winningest active head coach, Holmgren is tied (Philadelphia’s Andy Reid) as the third longest-tenured head coach with the same club behind Tennessee’s Jeff Fisher and Denver’s Mike Shanahan (14 years). His 170-110 (.607) career head coaching record trails Hall of Famer Joe Gibbs’ 171-101 record for tenth place in NFL history.

 

As the longest-tenured coach in club history, he passed Chuck Knox last season for most career Seattle victories. He is currently 86-68 (.558) while Knox compiled an 83-67 record in his nine years at the helm.

 

Holmgren originally joined the Seahawks as Executive Vice President/General Manager & Head Coach on January 9, 1999. Following the 2002 season, Holmgren decided to focus exclusively on coaching and relinquished his duties as general manager.

 

Since 2003, the Seahawks 51-29 record (.638) is the best in the NFC and are the only team in the NFC with a winning record each of the last five seasons. Seattle has posted five consecutive winning seasons for the first time in club history.

 

The Seahawks have made significant strides in becoming one of the elite teams in the NFL under Holmgren the last five seasons. The Seahawks reached 10 wins for just the fifth time in franchise history in 2007, marking the second time in three years that has been accomplished (2005).

 

Last season, Seattle made its third consecutive trip to the NFC Divisional Playoff round, only to fall to the Green Bay Packers, 42-20, at Lambeau Field in heavy snow. After a 4-4 start and his running game slowed, Holmgren leaned on the pass and his offense answered. Seattle posted a 6-2 record over the second-half of the season heading to the playoffs. Matt Hasselbeck carried the load and set Seattle single-season records for attempts (562), completions (352) and yards (3,966). He also threw for a career-high 28 touchdowns. Hasselbeck looked often to Bobby Engram, who himself had a career-year, with a team-record 94 catches for a career-high 1,147 yards, becoming only the sixth Seattle receiver to record a 1,000-yard season.

 

In 2006, Holmgren guided the Seahawks to the NFC Divisional Playoff Game after winning the NFC West and posting a 9-7 record. After beginning the season 4-1, Seattle persisted through injuries to nine offensive starters (totaling 48 combined games), including 2005 MVP Shaun Alexander who missed six games with a broken foot. Matt Hasselbeck missed four games in the middle of the season with an injured knee and finished the season with a small fracture in his left hand.

 

It was the first time Seattle has won a game in back-to-back postseasons since the 1983 and 1984 seasons and ended a five-season NFL streak in which the Super Bowl runner-up did not make the following postseason.

 

In 2005, he joined an elite group of coaches, becoming just the fifth coach in NFL history to take two different teams to the Super Bowl (1996 & 1997 Green Bay, 2005 Seattle). In that group are Bill Parcells, Dan Reeves, Don Shula and Dick Vermeil.

 

Holmgren guided Seattle’s second-ranked NFL offense to its best year in club history. Beginning the season 2-2, the Seahawks posted a club-record 11 straight wins en route to a 13-3 record. Undefeated at home for the second time under Holmgren (2003), Seattle earned the top seed in the NFC and a first-round bye to begin the postseason. The Seahawks defeated the Redskins, 20-10, and Carolina, 34-14, to advance to Super Bowl XL in Detroit. Seattle dropped the game to the Pittsburgh Steelers, 21-10.

 

In 2004, the Seahawks opened 3-0, including back-to-back road wins at New Orleans and at Tampa Bay before defeating San Francisco 34-0 ending the 49ers NFL-record streak without being shutout at 420 games. The Seahawks ended the season winning three of their last four, including wins over two playoff teams to secure its NFC West title.

 

Holmgren’s offense ranked sixth in the NFL in 2003 and produced four Pro Bowlers (Shaun Alexander, Hasselbeck, Steve Hutchinson, Walter Jones) along with Alex Bannister who earned a trip for his special teams play. The club finished seventh in scoring, third in total first downs while leading the league in third-down percentage.

 

After a slow start in 2002, Holmgren kept his club focused and finished the season winning five of the last eight games, including three consecutive to finish a season for the first time since 1986. His offensive unit finished the year ranked seventh in total offense and third in passing while compiling more yards than any other club over the last six weeks of the season. Trent Dilfer and Hasselbeck combined for a franchise–record five 300-yard passing games, and Koren Robinson became only the second receiver (Steve Largent) in Seahawks history to surpass the 1,200-yard receiving mark.

 

In 2001, Holmgren guided his young roster back to winning form and bounced back to post a 9-7 record. That was good for second place in the AFC West and equalled the team’s best mark since 1999 and 1990. The team won three of its last four contests and just missed the playoffs, being eliminated in the final week of the regular season.

 

The 2000 campaign saw Holmgren continue to mold the Seahawks into his vision, revamping the roster and adding players that would be the backbone of the team for seasons to come. He suffered his first losing season as a head coach, posting a 6-10 record with his young roster (AFC-high 17 rookie or first-year players) while shaping the team financially for years to come.

 

It is that financial foundation that allowed the club to add Deion Branch in 2006, retain key unrestricted free agents Jones and Hasselbeck in 2005, while adding key free agents Nate Burleson, Julian Peterson, Deon Grant and Julius Jones over the last couple of seasons. In his four seasons as general manager, Holmgren drafted 2005 MVP Alexander and was instrumental in trading for Hasselbeck in 2001.

 

In his first season with the Seahawks, Holmgren helped guide the club into their first postseason since 1988, breaking a 10-year playoff drought. The 9-7 regular-season record by the 1999 Seahawks was the best mark since posting a similar record in 1990.

 

By leading Seattle into the postseason, he became just the second coach in team history to take the Seahawks to the playoffs, and just the third coach in NFL history to guide a team to at least seven straight postseasons, joining Tom Landry (nine years, and eight years) and Chuck Noll (eight years).

 

Holmgren took control of the Seahawks following one of the most successful coaching stints in league history as head coach of the Green Bay Packers from 1992-98 that included a 75-37 (.670) regular-season record, a 9-5 (.643) postseason mark, and two Super Bowl appearances, including a 35-21 victory over the New England Patriots in Super Bowl XXXI played in New Orleans. By winning at least one game in five consecutive postseasons (1993-97), Holmgren joined John Madden (1973-77) as the only coaches in league history to accomplish the feat.

 

From 1995-98, Holmgren's Packers posted an NFL-best 48-16 (.762) record, finished first in the NFC Central Division three times, second once and posted a 7-3 mark in the playoffs.

 

By taking the Packers to six consecutive postseasons (1993-98), Holmgren established a franchise record, with a team that had recorded just two winning seasons in the 19 years before he was hired.

 

In 22 NFL seasons (1999-07 head coach Seattle, 1992-98 head coach Green Bay, 1986-91 assistant coach San Francisco), Holmgren's teams posted a 228-122-1 (.651) regular season record, hit double digits in the win column 13 times, made the postseason 17 times, won three Super Bowls (XXIII, XXIV, XXXI), and reached two other Super Bowls (XXXII & XL).

 

Holmgren's 1996 team that won the Super Bowl, led the NFL in scoring with a team-record 456 points and also led the league in defensive scoring, a feat that had not been accomplished since 1972.

 

Before becoming the Packers’ head coach, Holmgren served as an assistant coach of the San Francisco 49ers from 1986-91. He coached the 49ers’ quarterbacks from 1986-88 under head coach Bill Walsh, and was the team's offensive coordinator from 1989-91 under George Seifert. During his tenure in San Francisco, the 49ers posted a 71-23-1 (.753) regular-season record to reach the postseason each year, and won Super Bowl XXIII over Cincinnati and Super Bowl XXIV over Denver. As offensive coordinator in 1989, the 49ers boasted the NFL's top-ranked offense.

 

Prior to joining the 49ers staff, Holmgren coached quarterbacks at Brigham Young University from 1982-85, including a national championship in 1984. He also served as the offensive coordinator/quarterbacks coach at San Francisco State in 1981.

 

As a quarterback at San Francisco's Lincoln High School, Holmgren was named 1965's "Prep Athlete of the Year," before continuing his playing career at the University of Southern California from 1966-69. He was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the eighth round of the 1970 draft and went to camp with both the Cardinals and the New York Jets that year.

 

Holmgren, born June 15, 1948, began his coaching career in 1971 at his alma mater Lincoln High, where he also taught history. One year later, he moved to San Francisco's Sacred Heart High as a teacher and assistant coach. He also coached at Oak Grove High from 1975-80. He received a Bachelor of Science Degree from USC in 1970. Holmgren returned to the NFL’s influential Competition Committee February 6, 2002, after a three-year layoff, but stepped down in February 2006. He served as co-chair of the Committee along with former Buccaneers General Manager and current Falcons President and GM Rich McKay, having taken over for Don Shula, from 1996-98.

 

Mike and his wife, Kathy, have four daughters–twins Calla and Jenny, Emily, Gretchen, four granddaughters, Emma, Emerson, Mary, Isabell and one grandson, Luke.

 

Career History:

 

1971 Lincoln High School (San Francisco, Ca.): Assistant Coach

 

1972-74 Sacred Heart High School (San Francisco, Ca.): Assistant Coach

 

1975-80 Oak Grove High School (San Jose, Ca.): Assistant Coach 1981 San Francisco State University: Offensive Coordinator/Quarterbacks

 

1982-85 Brigham Young University: Quarterbacks Coach

 

1986-88 San Francisco 49ers: Quarterbacks Coach

 

1989-91 San Francisco 49ers: Offensive Coordinator

 

1992-98 Green Bay Packers: Head Coach

 

1999-02 Seattle Seahawks: Executive V.P. of Football Operations/G.M. & Head Coach

 

2003- Seattle Seahawks: Executive V.P of Football Operations/Head Coach

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