Coaches

Jim Mora
Head Coach
College:
Washington
Hometown:
Los Angeles, CA
Experience:
25

Named to his current position on January 21, 2007, Mora enters his second year with the Seahawks and brings 24 years of defensive philosophy to the club.

In his first season with an overhauled secondary with the additions and leadership of safeties Deon Grant and Brian Russell, Mora’s squad led the NFL in touchdown passes allowed (15) and led the NFC (4th NFL) with 20 interceptions. He saw former first-round pick Marcus Trufant pick off a career-high seven passes and earn his first Pro Bowl berth.

Mora joined Seattle after serving as Executive Vice President/Head Coach of the Atlanta Falcons from 2004-06. He compiled a 26-22 (.542) record during his three years in Atlanta.

Named to his current position on January 21, 2007, Mora enters his second year with the Seahawks and brings 24 years of defensive philosophy to the club.

 

In his first season with an overhauled secondary with the additions and leadership of safeties Deon Grant and Brian Russell, Mora’s squad led the NFL in touchdown passes allowed (15) and led the NFC (4th NFL) with 20 interceptions. He saw former first-round pick Marcus Trufant pick off a career-high seven passes and earn his first Pro Bowl berth.

 

Mora joined Seattle after serving as Executive Vice President/Head Coach of the Atlanta Falcons from 2004-06. He compiled a 26-22 (.542) record during his three years in Atlanta.

 

He and his staff guided the Falcons to an 11-5 record in 2004, becoming just the eighth rookie head coach in NFL history to win 11 games, captured the NFC South Division title, and led the Falcons to their second-ever appearance in the NFC Championship Game. The Kansas City 101 Club named him the 2004 NFC Coach of the Year.

 

The defense, which ranked dead last the year before, improved to 14th overall en route to leading the league with a franchise-record 48 quarterback sacks. Mora's defense, coordinated by defensive coordinator Ed Donatell, held opposing offenses to zero points in the first quarter nine times, and also led the league in rushing defense (167.0 ypg).

 

Mora joined the Falcons from the San Francisco 49ers where he spent seven seasons (1997-03), including the last five as defensive coordinator. His last two seasons, Mora's defense finished no worse than fourth in the NFC against the run and in 2003, the 49ers recorded 36 takeaways, their most since 1997. In addition, at least one player from Mora's defense was named to the Pro Bowl in four of his last five seasons as defensive coordinator.

 

Included among his 49ers coaching highlights, Mora's defense tied for first in the NFC with a +11 turnover differential on the heels of 36 takeaways. San Francisco's defense continued an impressive trend in 2003 as the 49ers did not allow a rusher to run for over 100 yards in their last 19 home games. San Francisco's staunch run defense at home was highlighted in 2003 by holding the St. Louis Rams to a mere nine yards rushing, which was the second-lowest rushing total by an opponent in 49ers team history. Mora's aggressive defense also produced 42 sacks in 2003 to tie for second in the NFC and it was the highest team total since 51 in 1998.

 

Mora's defensive creativity with talent was witnessed when he utilized Julian Peterson at four positions against Dallas in 2002 in which the 49ers clinched the NFC West Division title. Mora devised a clever game plan to move the athletic linebacker all over the field. Peterson played linebacker, defensive end, strong safety and cornerback because of injuries on defense. The Pro Football Hall of Fame recognized the unique feat as Peterson was the first player since the NFL merger in 1970 to play four positions in a game as he packed his bags for the Pro Bowl for the first time in his career.

 

In Mora's first season as the 49ers defensive coordinator in 1999, he developed DT Bryant Young and FS Lance Schulters into Pro Bowl performers and tutored his defense to a team-record tying five defensive touchdowns.

 

In his first year in 1997, the 49ers finished first in the NFL in total defense, second in pass defense (with 25 interceptions), takeaways (41) and run defense, as well as third in the League in sacks (54). Mora helped San Francisco advance to the NFC Championship Game where five members of the defense were voted to the Pro Bowl. A year later, Mora's troops tied for first in the NFC and fourth in the NFL with 21 interceptions.

 

James Lawrence Mora joined his father, James Ernest Mora, in 1992 as the secondary coach for the New Orleans Saints. Growing up with a father in the NFL gave Mora the opportunity to be a visiting locker room attendant for the Seattle Seahawks at a young age and was a ball boy at the 1978 Rose Bowl.

 

It was in New Orleans that Mora started to distinguish himself as one of the NFL's premier position coaches as the Saints boasted the top-ranked pass defense in the NFL during his first two years. Mora remained with New Orleans through the 1996 season.

 

Mora broke in to the NFL with the San Diego Chargers in 1985. In his first year, his position was the first-ever in the NFL to be known as a quality control coach, consisting of duties such as breaking down game film, charting defenses, opponent tendencies, self-scout tendencies and game analysis reports.

 

He was named defensive assistant/secondary one year later, a position he held until earning the role of defensive backs coach in 1989.

 

After his playing days at the University of Washington as a walk-on linebacker (1981-83), he began his coaching career as a defensive assistant under Don James in 1984. While at Washington, Mora had the opportunity to be a part of two Rose Bowl teams, in addition to helping the Huskies to a berth in the Orange Bowl as a graduate assistant in 1984.

 

Established the Jim Mora Count on Me Family Foundation on April 25, 2006 at the Georgia Aquarium. The foundation targets three areas: children from low socio-economic backgrounds, mentally and physically challenged children, and “at-risk” children who lack stability or support in their lives.

 

Married to wife, Shannon, with daughter Lillia, and sons, Cole, Ryder and Trey. Has two brothers, Stephen, a mortgage broker in Bend, Ore., and Michael, an architect in Seattle.

 

Career History:


1984         Defensive Asst. - Univ. of Washington


1985         Quality Control/Defense - San Diego Chargers


1986-88     Defensive Asst./Secondary - San Diego Chargers


1989-91     Defensive Backs - San Diego Chargers


1992-96     Secondary - New Orleans Saints


1997-98     Secondary - San Francisco 49ers


1999-2003  Defensive Coordinator - 49ers


2004-06     Exec. V.P./Head Coach - Atlanta Falcons


2007-        Asst. Head Coach/Secondary - Seattle Seahawks

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