Coaches

Gil Haskell
Asst. Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator
College:
USC
Hometown:
San Francisco, CA
Experience:
26

Named to his current position on January 20, 2000, Haskell joined his long-time friend and peer Mike Holmgren. As the team’s offensive coordinator, Haskell works closely with Holmgren in implementing an innovative and precise offensive scheme. His sole responsibility is guiding the offense.

Last year, the Seahawks offense took to the air over the last half of the season and as a result saw Matt Hasselbeck and Bobby Engram turn in the finest seasons in Seahawks history. Hasselbeck set Seattle single-season records for attempts (562), completions (352) and yards (3,966). He also threw for a career-high 28 touchdowns. He looked often to Engram, with a team-record 94 catches for a career-high 1,147 yards, becoming only the sixth Seattle receiver to record a 1,000-yard season. Also, Haskell’s seven-year run of sending at least one player to the Pro Bowl continued, as Walter Jones and Hasselbeck were voted to the NFC roster.

The 2006 edition of Haskell’s offense was hit by injuries to key players, as a total of nine offensive starters missed 48 combined games. He lost reigning league MVP Shaun Alexander for six games and Hasselbeck for four games while Maurice Morris and Seneca Wallace filled in, respectively. Morris set career-highs in rush yards (604) and posted two 100-yard games while Wallace saw his most extensive playing time of his career and tossed eight touchdowns while posting a 2-2 record. In addition, Haskell’s six-year run of sending at least one player to the Pro Bowl continued, as Walter Jones and Mack Strong were voted to the NFC roster.

Named to his current position on January 20, 2000, Haskell joined his long-time friend and peer Mike Holmgren. As the team’s offensive coordinator, Haskell works closely with Holmgren in implementing an innovative and precise offensive scheme. His sole responsibility is guiding the offense.

 

Last year, the Seahawks offense took to the air over the last half of the season and as a result saw Matt Hasselbeck and Bobby Engram turn in the finest seasons in Seahawks history. Hasselbeck set Seattle single-season records for attempts (562), completions (352) and yards (3,966). He also threw for a career-high 28 touchdowns. He looked often to Engram, with a team-record 94 catches for a career-high 1,147 yards, becoming only the sixth Seattle receiver to record a 1,000-yard season. Also, Haskell’s seven-year run of sending at least one player to the Pro Bowl continued, as Walter Jones and Hasselbeck were voted to the NFC roster.

 

The 2006 edition of Haskell’s offense was hit by injuries to key players, as a total of nine offensive starters missed 48 combined games. He lost reigning league MVP Shaun Alexander for six games and Hasselbeck for four games while Maurice Morris and Seneca Wallace filled in, respectively. Morris set career-highs in rush yards (604) and posted two 100-yard games while Wallace saw his most extensive playing time of his career and tossed eight touchdowns while posting a 2-2 record. In addition, Haskell’s six-year run of sending at least one player to the Pro Bowl continued, as Walter Jones and Mack Strong were voted to the NFC roster.

 

It was a banner year in 2005 for the Seahawks offense as it finished the season ranked second in total offense and earned a trip to Super Bowl XL. Haskell’s unit led the NFL in points per game (28.3), red zone offense (71.7%), fourth-down efficiency (7/8), a club-record 57 touchdowns and 24 80+-yard drives. His playbook allowed Alexander to lead the league in rushing with a club-record 1,880 yards and an NFL-record 28 total touchdowns (NFL-record 27 rush, 1 rec.), since eclipsed by San Diego’s LaDainian Tomlinson. The offense also boasted six Pro Bowlers (Alexander, Hasselbeck, Steve Hutchinson, Jones, Strong, Robbie Tobeck).

 

Haskell helped the Seahawks ground attack rank 2nd in the NFC in 2004, and also helped Alexander rank 2nd in the NFL with a franchise-record 1,696 rushing yards. His 20 total touchdowns topped the NFL and club charts.

 

Haskell’s 2003 offense was highlighted by sending four offensive players to the Pro Bowl (Alexander, Hasselbeck, Hutchinson, and Jones). Seattle’s offense ranked 6th in the NFL (4th NFC) and led the League in first downs/game (21.1) and third-down conversions (46.8%). He helped Hasselbeck set a franchise record for passing yards (3,841) and tie the record for most completions in a season (313). He also helped Hasselbeck become the highest-rated passer in club history.

 

In 2002, Haskell guided a Seattle aerial attack that ranked third in the NFL averaging 254.9 yards a game. Seattle also set a franchise record gaining 5,818 total offensive yards that included a franchise-record three 500-yard games of total offense. Haskell coordinated an offense that allowed Hasselbeck to finish the season ranked first in the NFC with a 63.7 completion percentage and second in the NFC with a 87.8 passer rating. Not only did the offense excel through the air, Haskell kept Alexander on track setting a franchise record with 16 rushing and 18 total touchdowns.

 

Haskell’s 2001 offensive plan was tailored to the running style of second-year back Alexander. His schemes helped Alexander enjoy a breakout year and rush for the NFL’s fourth-best performance in history (currently fifth) with 266 yards vs. Oakland. Add Ricky Watters in the mix and Seattle ranked fifth in the AFC (9th NFL) with 121.0 yards per game. Overall, Seattle’s offense increased to 298.3 yards per game.

 

In his first year as offensive coordinator for Seattle, Haskell oversaw the AFC’s top-ranked (2nd NFL) red zone offense, scoring 60.9% of the time. His offense gained 292.5 yards per game, threw for 185.0 yards and rushed for 107.5 yards, ranking 11th in each category in the AFC.

 

Haskell joined the Seahawks after serving in the same capacity for the Carolina Panthers (1998-99) where his offense finished sixth in the NFL in 1999, with 355.4 yards per game in total offense, including the second-ranked passing attack in the NFL with 260.1 passing yards per game. He orchestrated an offense in 1999 that set team records in total yards (5,686), points (421) and passing yards (4,161), and also sent three players (QB Steve Beuerlein, WR Muhsin Muhammad and TE Wesley Walls) to the Pro Bowl.

 

The 25-year NFL coaching veteran rejoined Holmgren after serving six seasons (1992-97), three as wide receivers coach (1995-97) and three as running backs coach (1992-94), for the Green Bay Packers.

 

While receivers coach under Holmgren, Haskell coached the Packers’ record-setting Pro Bowl receiving duo of Antonio Freeman and Robert Brooks.

 

Before his tenure with the Packers, Haskell entered the NFL in 1983 and served nine seasons with the Los Angeles Rams (1983-91), the first four as special teams coach, four seasons as running backs coach, and one as tight ends/special teams coach. Haskell coached three 1,000-yard rushers (Eric Dickerson, Greg Bell and Charles White) and sent two to the Pro Bowl (Dickerson, White) during his four years coaching the position.

 

Directing special teams, Haskell’s unit was
ranked number one. Led by 1984 Pro Bowl punt returner Henry Ellard, Haskell’s units ranked first in the NFL in 1984 and 1985. After the 1985 season, Ellard’s 13.51 punt return average was an NFL record for highest-career average. Haskell also sent kick returner Ron Brown and punter Dale Hatcher to the 1985 Pro Bowl.

 

Prior to a distinguished NFL career, his late uncle, Dr. William O’Grady, was part owner of the San Francisco 49ers, and before leaving for the University of Southern California in 1978, Haskell worked for the 49ers for 22 years.

 

Haskell spent five seasons as wide receivers and special teams coach for USC (1978-82) and nine years at San Francisco's St. Ignatius High School (1969-77), serving as head coach the final five seasons.

 

He was reunited with his former St. Ignatius assistant coach, Bill Laveroni, in 2002 who was hired at the time to be the Seahawks’ assistant offensive line coach.

 

Haskell, born September 24, 1943, and his wife, Nancy, have four grown daughters, Paula, Patty, Jenny, Julie and three granddaughters, Avery, Ryan and Isabella.

 

Career History:


1978-82   University of Southern California: Special Teams & Wide Receivers


1983-86   Los Angeles Rams: Special Teams


1987-90   Los Angeles Rams: Running Backs


1991-92   Los Angeles Rams: Tight Ends/Special Teams


1992-94   Green Bay Packers: Running Backs


1995-97   Green Bay Packers: Wide Receivers


1998-99   Carolina Panthers: Offensive Coordinator


2000-06   Seattle Seahawks: Offensive Coordinator


2007-       Seattle Seahawks: Assistant Head Coach/Offensive Coordinator

Recent Videos